Neptune – Feature Film

Feature Film Released: 2015 | Last House Productions

DIRECTED BY: Derek Kimball
WRITTEN BY: Matthew Konkel & Derek Kimball
STARRING: Jane Ackermann, Tony Reilly,
and William McDonough III
WITH: Christine Louise Marshall, and Dylan Chestnut

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Neptune is set on an island off the coast of Maine. Fourteen-year-old orphan Hannah Newcombe has been raised by the church under the overbearing influence of its resident cleric, the insular Jerry Cook. When a boy Hannah’s age is washed out to sea she becomes increasingly obsessed with his disappearance. Haunting dreams and visions occupy Hannah’s mind and she is moved to pacify them. She takes a job on a lobsterboat in a position previously held by the missing boy; her limited upbringing becomes affected by something broader and more elemental. She begins lashing out at those around her, severing ties and eventually breaking free from the island to find spiritual autonomy.


“Richly photographed… the film is powered by the sumptuous aesthetic vision of quiet, blue-tinged oceanside unease that Kimball and his cinematographers, Jayson Lobozzo and Dean Merrill, who use natural light and a willingness to plumb the depths of night exteriors, are able to mine for great effect. ” – Filmmaker Magazine


“…It (Neptune) also happens to be one of the festival’s best pictures in years…
…With painterly photography that turns the world into an almost impressionistic landscape and a lyrically moving camera as comfortable following a character as it is framing their face dead center, Neptune is a lush picture that thrives in the quiet moments, a young woman trying to come to grips with a sense of grief she recognizes but has no clear way of defeating.” – Criterion Cast Review


“Set in the late 1980s and shot with a gorgeous and evocative style, director Derek Kimball captures the rugged and fiercely independent atmosphere of Maine…” – Irish Film Critic

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Neptune

Released: 2015 | Last House Productions
DIRECTED BY: Derek Kimball WRITTEN BY: Matthew Konkel & Derek Kimball STARRING: Jane Ackermann, Tony Reilly,
and William McDonough III WITH: Christine Louise Marshall, and Dylan Chestnut
"Richly photographed... the film is powered by the sumptuous aesthetic vision of quiet, blue-tinged oceanside unease that Kimball and his cinematographers, Jayson Lobozzo and Dean Merrill, who use natural light and a willingness to plumb the depths of night exteriors, are able to mine for great effect. " - Filmmaker Magazine "...It (Neptune) also happens to be one of the festival’s best pictures in years... ...With painterly photography that turns the world into an almost impressionistic landscape and a lyrically moving camera as comfortable following a character as it is framing their face dead center, Neptune is a lush picture that thrives in the quiet moments, a young woman trying to come to grips with a sense of grief she recognizes but has no clear way of defeating." - Criterion Cast Review "Set in the late 1980s and shot with a gorgeous and evocative style, director Derek Kimball captures the rugged and fiercely independent atmosphere of Maine..." - Irish Film Critic
Neptune is set on an island off the coast of Maine. Fourteen-year-old orphan Hannah Newcombe has been raised by the church under the overbearing influence of its resident cleric, the insular Jerry Cook. When a boy Hannah’s age is washed out to sea she becomes increasingly obsessed with his disappearance. Haunting dreams and visions occupy Hannah’s mind and she is moved to pacify them. She takes a job on a lobsterboat in a position previously held by the missing boy; her limited upbringing becomes affected by something broader and more elemental. She begins lashing out at those around her, severing ties and eventually breaking free from the island to find spiritual autonomy.
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